Is the Hospital of the Future Here Today?

Technology is constantly evolving and businesses are forced to evolve with it, finding new ways to operate and doing so in a more efficient and cost-effective way. The healthcare sector, and hospitals in particular, are often at the forefront of these changes, and 2020 is no exception.

Covid-19 has forced many hospitals to adapt, to utilize more efficient technologies as a means of dealing with the sudden demand that this pandemic has generated. Office workers and B2B professionals aren’t the only ones to jump on the remote working bandwagon with services like Zoom. Telecommunications are also helping to reduce patient numbers in hospitals and other healthcare settings, keeping medical experts safe and patients locked down.

Other technologies are in development, as well, with experts using the Coronavirus to predict how these businesses can survive in an overpopulated world where people are living longer, diseases are more treatable, and deadly pandemics are always just around the corner.

Healthcare companies are working around the clock to predict, prepare, and implement, and there are some exciting trends in the pipeline. What’s even more promising is that many of these game-changing technologies are already here and are ready to change the world.

Personalized Medicines

One of the improvements that is already being implemented is personalized medicines. These medicines are used in cancer treatments and can help when a patient has a genomic mutation in a particular gene.

In the future, medicines and doses tailored to your exact genetic composition and illness could be the norm. Imagine a multi-vitamin that gives you exactly what you need, accounting for absorption problems, contraindications, and more, or a painkiller that delivers an optimal therapeutic dose every time.

The tech is already here, and while we don’t yet have the means to make it affordable, the rapidly evolving 3D printing industry could provide the answer.

Virtual Health Care Visits

Forced lockdowns have seen a sharp rise in healthcare appointments performed over video conferencing tools. But what about people who are housebound regardless of COVID-19? What about the old, infirm, disabled, agoraphobic, and those who live miles from their nearest clinic?

Psychiatric practices have already taken advantage of virtual healthcare, and it’s been a great success. It allows their patients to feel more comfortable since they are already in an environment they are used to, which means they are more likely to open up. In the future, however, this will likely become the norm for all aspects of healthcare, reaching a point where you’ll only need to leave your home if you require surgery or tests.

Expansion and Specialization of Hospital Services

Hospitals will likely become a part of a bigger system. While they will still provide the functions that we know today, they will likely become bigger drivers of overall health services. For instance, they could provide housing, employment, and utility access, along with anything else that improves the health of their patients.

These changes could also allow hospitals to provide more holistic care services. This could potentially make hospitals a more relaxing place to visit. While every hospital will likely not provide all of these services, they will expand their range based on the needs of their community.
Some modern hospitals, such as the Cancer Treatment Centers of America, focus on one type of healthcare. In the future, these might become more common. You may find hospitals that only deal with trauma patients or even pandemic patients—allowing them to focus more time and resources on fewer medical operations.

Implementing Data Integration and Analytics

Data plays a big role in hospital operations and goes a long way in improving patient care while simultaneously reducing costs. Currently, hospitals collect a wide range of data that goes into providing patients with better care, but it is not always fully utilized.

In the future, there may become more digital command centers where people collect, store, and analyze this data. It will then be used to make predictions concerning necessary services and care, ultimately make life easier for patients and cheaper for hospitals.

Automating Tasks with Robots

Robots have the potential to replace many of the mundane tasks performed in every hospital. They’re already utilized, but in the future, they will play a bigger role.

For example, a robot can be used to document a patient’s vital signs and administer medication. They could even be used to conduct small procedures, and while they won’t replace nurses or other healthcare experts, they will make their lives easier.

Technologies to Improve Patient Comfort

Hospitals can use technologies in many ways. They could, for instance, develop apps to help patients find the best parking spaces or confirm that they are in the right department for their appointment.

Hospitals could also take advantage of wearables, which can be used to measure vital signs such as the patient’s heart rate and blood pressure. Testing kits can also be sent to the patient, with the results recorded instantly and fed directly to both the patient and their healthcare providers. This is something we have seen during the pandemic, and the system has received more than its fair share of trials due to the mass of COVID-19 tests being sent, performed, and recorded on a daily basis.

Personalized Smart Rooms

Finally, hospitals may start to use smart rooms and personalized rooms. These rooms will be specific to the patient’s needs, attempting to make them happier and more comfortable, which should promote healing.

Smart rooms will allow patients to adjust the temperature and lights using just their voice. They can even play some relaxing music. The best thing about this technology is that it already exists, and it has been commercialized to the point where it is cheap and widely available. It just needs to be implemented in a medical setting.

The COVID-19 Pandemic Continues to Push Healthcare to its Limits

COVID-19 has pushed hospitals to a more futuristic form of healthcare, and this trend is likely to continue. Our hospitals have evolved greatly over the last several years, and while some of these futuristic features are not a reality just yet, they could be very soon. Many experts believe that hospitals will have adopted these technologies by 2040.

At the end of the day, this technology will be used to make life easier for nurses and doctors, easing some of their daily strain and, ultimately, improving the level of care provided to the patient. Technology will continue to improve, opportunities will continue to present themselves, and if hospitals want to be prepared for the next pandemic or the next big human issue, they need to start embracing these changes.

Is the Hospital of the Future Here Today?

Technology is constantly evolving and businesses are forced to evolve with it, finding new ways to operate and doing so in a more efficient and cost-effective way. The healthcare sector, and hospitals in particular, are often at the forefront of these changes, and 2020 is no exception.

Covid-19 has forced many hospitals to adapt, to utilize more efficient technologies as a means of dealing with the sudden demand that this pandemic has generated. Office workers and B2B professionals aren’t the only ones to jump on the remote working bandwagon with services like Zoom. Telecommunications are also helping to reduce patient numbers in hospitals and other healthcare settings, keeping medical experts safe and patients locked down.

Other technologies are in development, as well, with experts using the Coronavirus to predict how these businesses can survive in an overpopulated world where people are living longer, diseases are more treatable, and deadly pandemics are always just around the corner.

Healthcare companies are working around the clock to predict, prepare, and implement, and there are some exciting trends in the pipeline. What’s even more promising is that many of these game-changing technologies are already here and are ready to change the world.

Personalized Medicines

One of the improvements that is already being implemented is personalized medicines. These medicines are used in cancer treatments and can help when a patient has a genomic mutation in a particular gene.

In the future, medicines and doses tailored to your exact genetic composition and illness could be the norm. Imagine a multi-vitamin that gives you exactly what you need, accounting for absorption problems, contraindications, and more, or a painkiller that delivers an optimal therapeutic dose every time.

The tech is already here, and while we don’t yet have the means to make it affordable, the rapidly evolving 3D printing industry could provide the answer.

Virtual Health Care Visits

Forced lockdowns have seen a sharp rise in healthcare appointments performed over video conferencing tools. But what about people who are housebound regardless of COVID-19? What about the old, infirm, disabled, agoraphobic, and those who live miles from their nearest clinic?

Psychiatric practices have already taken advantage of virtual healthcare, and it’s been a great success. It allows their patients to feel more comfortable since they are already in an environment they are used to, which means they are more likely to open up. In the future, however, this will likely become the norm for all aspects of healthcare, reaching a point where you’ll only need to leave your home if you require surgery or tests.

Expansion and Specialization of Hospital Services

Hospitals will likely become a part of a bigger system. While they will still provide the functions that we know today, they will likely become bigger drivers of overall health services. For instance, they could provide housing, employment, and utility access, along with anything else that improves the health of their patients.

These changes could also allow hospitals to provide more holistic care services. This could potentially make hospitals a more relaxing place to visit. While every hospital will likely not provide all of these services, they will expand their range based on the needs of their community.
Some modern hospitals, such as the Cancer Treatment Centers of America, focus on one type of healthcare. In the future, these might become more common. You may find hospitals that only deal with trauma patients or even pandemic patients—allowing them to focus more time and resources on fewer medical operations.

Implementing Data Integration and Analytics

Data plays a big role in hospital operations and goes a long way in improving patient care while simultaneously reducing costs. Currently, hospitals collect a wide range of data that goes into providing patients with better care, but it is not always fully utilized.

In the future, there may become more digital command centers where people collect, store, and analyze this data. It will then be used to make predictions concerning necessary services and care, ultimately make life easier for patients and cheaper for hospitals.

Automating Tasks with Robots

Robots have the potential to replace many of the mundane tasks performed in every hospital. They’re already utilized, but in the future, they will play a bigger role.

For example, a robot can be used to document a patient’s vital signs and administer medication. They could even be used to conduct small procedures, and while they won’t replace nurses or other healthcare experts, they will make their lives easier.

Technologies to Improve Patient Comfort

Hospitals can use technologies in many ways. They could, for instance, develop apps to help patients find the best parking spaces or confirm that they are in the right department for their appointment.

Hospitals could also take advantage of wearables, which can be used to measure vital signs such as the patient’s heart rate and blood pressure. Testing kits can also be sent to the patient, with the results recorded instantly and fed directly to both the patient and their healthcare providers. This is something we have seen during the pandemic, and the system has received more than its fair share of trials due to the mass of COVID-19 tests being sent, performed, and recorded on a daily basis.

Personalized Smart Rooms

Finally, hospitals may start to use smart rooms and personalized rooms. These rooms will be specific to the patient’s needs, attempting to make them happier and more comfortable, which should promote healing.

Smart rooms will allow patients to adjust the temperature and lights using just their voice. They can even play some relaxing music. The best thing about this technology is that it already exists, and it has been commercialized to the point where it is cheap and widely available. It just needs to be implemented in a medical setting.

The COVID-19 Pandemic Continues to Push Healthcare to its Limits

COVID-19 has pushed hospitals to a more futuristic form of healthcare, and this trend is likely to continue. Our hospitals have evolved greatly over the last several years, and while some of these futuristic features are not a reality just yet, they could be very soon. Many experts believe that hospitals will have adopted these technologies by 2040.

At the end of the day, this technology will be used to make life easier for nurses and doctors, easing some of their daily strain and, ultimately, improving the level of care provided to the patient. Technology will continue to improve, opportunities will continue to present themselves, and if hospitals want to be prepared for the next pandemic or the next big human issue, they need to start embracing these changes.

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